Publications – Books

Cover Laod BookThe Apocryphal Epistle to the Laodiceans: An Epistolary and Rhetorical Analysis. Texts and Editions for New Testament Study, 7. Brill Academic Publishers, 2012.

Abstract and Table of Contents

Challenging nearly two centuries of scholarship, this book offers the first close analysis of the apocryphal epistle to the Laodiceans. A near consensus in scholarship has emerged in which Laodiceans is dismissed as a random collection of phrases plucked from the undisputed Pauline letters, which lacks any organizational structure or theological sophistication. In The Apocryphal Epistle to the Laodiceans, Philip Tite offers a detailed analysis of this Latin letter by exploring the epistolary conventions utilized by the letter writer. What emerges is a pseudonymous text that is a carefully crafted paraenetic letter with a discernible rhetorical situation. By highlighting Laodiceans’ use of Paul as a literary culture hero, Tite situates the letter within second-century Christian identity formation.

 

I. Introduction

 

II. Epistolary Analysis I: The Prescript

 

III. Epistolary Analysis II: The Thanksgiving Period

 

IV. Epistolary Analysis III: The Letter Body

 

V. Epistolary Analysis IV: The Paraenesis

 

VI. Epistolary Analysis V: The Letter Closing

 

VII. A Theological Synthesis of Laodiceans

 

VIII. Concluding Comments

 

Appendix I: Text, Translation, and Epistolary Arrangement of Laodiceans

 

Appendix II: Dating the Apocryphal Epistle to the Laodiceans

 

Cover Valentinianism BookValentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity. Nag Hammadi and Manichaean Studies, 67. Brill Academic Publishers, 2009.

Abstract and Table of Contents

Offering a fresh assessment of the presence and function of paraenesis within Valentinianism, this book places Valentinian moral exhortation within the context of early Christian moral discourse. Like other early Christians, Valentinians were not only interested in ethics, but used moral exhortation to discursively shape social identity. Building on the increasing recognition of ethical and communal concerns reflected in the Nag Hammadi sources, this book advances the discussion by elucidating the social rhetoric within, especially, the Gospel of Truth and the Interpretation of Knowledge. The social function of paraenesis is to persuade an audience through social re-presentation. The authors of these texts discursively position their readers, and themselves, within engaging moments of narrativity. It is hoped that this study will encourage greater integration of research between those working on the Nag Hammadi material and those studying early Christian paraenetic discourse.

 

I. Introduction

 

II. Constructing Social Identity Though Discourse: A Socio-Rhetorical Approach for the Study of Valentinian Paraenesis

 

III. Defining Paraenesis I: The Historical Phases within the Academic Study of Paraenesis

 

IV. Defining Paraenesis II: Towards a Functional Understanding of Paraenesis

 

V. Literary Indicators of Paraenesis: Indications of Moral Exhortation from the Greco-Roman World with Valentinianism

 

VI. Two Schools and the Call to Reconciliation: Literary and Social Aspects of Moral Exhortation in the Interpretation of Knowledge

 

VII. Existing in Error: Literary and Social Aspects of Moral Exhortation in the Gospel of Truth

 

VIII. Conclusion

 

Cover RTV BookReligion, Terror, and Violence: Religious Studies Perspectives. Co-edited with Bryan Rennie. Routledge, 2008.

Abstract and Table of Contents

September 11 and the subsequent War on Terror continues to cast a long shadow over the world. Religion, Terror and Violence brings together a group of distinguished scholars from a range of backgrounds and disciplines to explore the claim that acts of violence – most spectacularly the attack of September 11, 2001 and the international reaction to it – were intimately linked to cultural and social authorizing processes that could be called ‘religious.’

This book provides a nuanced but incisive insight into the reaction of the discipline of religious studies to the post 9/11 world.

 

INTRODUCTION

1. “Sacred violence and the scholar of religion as public intellectual” – Philip L. Tite

 

EXPLANATORY APPROACHES TO VIOLENCE AND RELIGION

2. “Violence as internal and external” – Robert A. Segal

 

RHETORICAL REFLECTIONS

3. “Savage Civil Religion” – Paul Christopher Johnson

4. “The rhetoric of evil and eradicating terrorism” – Caryn D. Riswold

5. “The tricks and treats of classification: searching for the heart of authentic Islam” – Russell T. McCutcheon

6. “Discussion: rhetorical reflections” – Anna S. King

 

THEOLOGICAL REFLECTIONS

7. “A new paradigm of international relations? Reflections after September 11, 2001” – Hans Küng

8. “Can love save the world?” – Walter Wink

9. “Discussion: theological reflections” – Samuel M Powell

 

HISTORICAL AND SOCIAL REFLECTIONS

10. “Religious terror and global war” – Mark Juergensmeyer

11. “Jihad and Islamic history” – Jonathan E. Brockopp

12. “The roots of public attitudes toward state accommodation of European Muslims’ religious practices before and after September 11” – Joel S. Fetzer and J. Christopher Soper

13. “Buddhist perspectives on terrorism” – Martin T. Adam and Wayne Codling

14. “Discussion: historical and social reflections” – Michel Desjardins

 

PEDAGOGICAL AND PROFESSIONAL REFLECTIONS

15. “Teaching Islam through and after September 11: towards a progressive Muslim agenda” – Omid Safi

16. “Islam within the context of higher education” – Zayn Kassam

17. “Thoughts on being a scholar of Islam and a Muslim in American post-9/11” – Amir Hussain

18 “Discussion: pedagogical and professional reflections” – Susan E. Henking

 

AESTHETIC REFLECTIONS

19. “Seeing what is missing: art, artists, and September 11” – Maureen Korp

 

CONCLUDING REFLECTIONS

20. “Religion, violence, and the pursuit of truth” – Bryan Rennie

 

Cover CPV BookConceiving Peace and Violence: A New Testament Legacy. University Press of America, 2004.

Abstract and Table of Contents

In this book, Philip Tite explores the role of biblical texts in the promotion of peace and violence. He begins by exploring the function of religious texts as ideological elements, recognizing that the New Testament affects the social construction of ‘realities’ or cultures within which people read and apply authoritative writings to ethical discussions. Arguing that an ‘engaged reading ‘ of these texts is central within moral discourse, Dr. Tite explores such issues as feminist challenges to biblical ethics, Jewish-Christian relations, and gay and lesbian ethical disputes in Christianity.

 

PART ONE: CONCEIVING PEACE AND VIOLENCE

A Personal Journey

Examples of Biblical Peace and Violence Promotion

Ideological Construction

Peace and Violence Promotion

Concluding Comments

 

PART TWO: EXPLORING PEACE AND VIOLENCE

Case Study One: The Fourth Gospel

Case Study Two: 1 Peter

Concluding Comments

 

PART THREE: ASSESSING PEACE AND VIOLENCE

Challenge of Gender Issues

Challenge of Anti-Semitism

Challenge of Gay Culture

A Personal Challenge

 

Cover 1 Peter BookCompositional Transitions in 1 Peter: An Analysis of the Letter-Opening. International Scholars Publications, 1997.

Abstract and Table of Contents

Philip Tite shows a marked fascination with the way the author of 1 Peter skillfully creates a text whose sections lead effectively and forcefully move the argument forward incrementally while giving new meaning to surrounding passages. Emphasis is placed on the letter’s opening section but what is revealed in 1:1-14 about Peter’s rhetorical art applies to the letter as a whole.

 

CHAPTER ONE: METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS

Introuction

History of Scholarship

A Rhetorical and Literary Approach

 

CHAPTER TWO: LETTER-OPENING

Introduction

The Nature of the Prescript (1:1-3)

The Transition from the Prescript to the Blessing (1:2-3)

The Transition from the Blessing to the Body Opening (1:10-13)

The Transition from the Body Opening to the Body Middle (1:13-14)

 

CHAPTER THREE: CONCLUSION

 

APPENDIX ONE: A MODIFICATION OF THE FIRST METAPHOR CLUSTER

 

APPENDIX TWO: COMPOSITIONAL OUTLINE OF 1 PETER

 

APPENDIX THREE: THE RHETORICAL STRATEGY OF 1 PETER 3:12-4:1